Evaluation of rosenbergs self esteem scale

This is an free online version of the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale. Validity This scale is the most widely used measure of self esteem for research purposes but it is NOT a diagnostic aid for any for any psychological issues of states.

Evaluation of rosenbergs self esteem scale

See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. The purpose of this report was to replicate Marsh et al. Our results indicated that indeed a response-bias does exist in esteem responses. Researchers should investigate ways to meaningfully examine and practically overcome the methodological challenges associated with the RSE scale.

Introduction Self-esteem has been an integral construct in the field of psychology for decades. This scale has been used extensively with samples of all ages, from adolescents to older adults.

Although the psychometric properties of this self-report measure have been rigorously tested, researchers have questioned whether the positively and negatively worded items are interchangeable, i.

Introduction

Overall, researchers agree that methodological decisions should be guided by substantive and theoretical arguments. Recently, Marsh et al. They used two approaches, correlated uniquenesses and latent method factors, to account for the hypothesized method effects. Each approach has strengths and weaknesses.

Most notably, the correlated uniquenesses approach assumes different types of method bias are uncorrelated with each other, and the latent method approach relaxes this assumption. However, the latter solutions are prone to producing inadmissible solutions and do not converge as easily as the former approaches.

Overall, Marsh et al found a consistent response-style bias associated with the item wording of the RSE. However, one of the limitations of their study was that their findings were based solely on the responses of adolescent males.

Furthermore, no studies have explored potential individual differences in the interpretation of RSE, across gender or levels of education among older adults. The purpose of this study was to replicate Marsh et al. Approximately half of the sample graduated from college or attained higher education Participants completed the original item RSE Rosenberg, along with demographic information.

The responses on the scale were measured on a 5-point Likert scale: Five of the items are positively-worded items 1, 2, 4, 6, and 7 whereas the remaining five are negatively-worded 3, 5, 8, 9, and 10 ; negative items were reverse-coded prior to data analysis.

All modeling was conducted using raw data with version 6. Paralleling the procedures used by Marsh et alwe tested eight models, including a 1-factor structure with no additional parameter constraints Model 1a model involving a 2-factor latent structure, i.

Note that method factors were specified to covary a priori.This is an free online version of the Rosenberg Self Esteem Scale. Validity This scale is the most widely used measure of self esteem for research purposes but it is NOT a diagnostic aid for any for any psychological issues of states.

Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale in its brevity (10 items), and its easy-to- understand format is, in American research, the instrument of . The scale ranges from Scores between 15 and 25 are within normal range; scores below 15 suggest low self-esteem. General Information for Using the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (SES): While designed as a Guttman scale, the SES is now commonly scored as a Likert scale.

Evaluation of rosenbergs self esteem scale

The 10 items are answered on a four point scale ranging from strongly agree to strongly disagree. Rosenberg’s self esteem scale is a ten item scale that asks individuals to rate themselves using four categories (strongly agree to strongly disagree) on statements regarding their .

of the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 23, The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, a widely used self-reportinstrument for evaluating individual self-esteem, was investigatedusing item response theory.

Using the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale | SOCY l Sociology Department l University of Maryland